Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
CSPAN 35
LANGUAGE
English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35
working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax deduction. almost the same amount said it would be willing to give up their deduction for state taxes. 19% said they would be willing to give up host: we would like to hear what deduction you would give up. you can weigh in on our facebook page, there's a poll set up where you can tell us specifically which interest
on the fiscal cliff. this morning "washington journal" talk to a business representative about his take on the negotiations. host: let's begin with what is business forward, how did it come about? guest: is simple mission. our job is to make it easier for business leaders in the country who care about policy issues but did not have a washington office or a lobbyist, to speak about the issues of public policy. host: is this a brand-new organization? who is involved? >> we have been around 3 1/2 years, supported by some of the biggest companies of the world, with business leaders are in the country. we go out to small business owners, entrepreneurs, venture capitalist to get them involved in policy-making. what we do is we bring administration officials, members of congress, governors out to cities around the country to be briefings with business leaders. what we also do is bring the business leaders to washington. we tell them how to grow jobs and accelerate. host: what did the business leaders say to the president and how did it come about? guest: we have been doing this for a year, bri
it be ok if doing so sent us over the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media websites. a very good morning to you. i want to begin with the question of compromise or sticking to principle. this is a question a gallup organization asked in a recent poll. it found 62% of americans would like to see the federal government leaders compromise on an agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff budget measures set to go into effect next month. more than twice the 25% who want leaders to stick to their principles. a majority of all party groups favor compromise. here is the breakdown from the gallup organization. 71% of democrats say they want a compromise bursa's 21% who say the party should stick to their principles. among republicans 55% one compromise. 35% say stick to your principles. the gallup poll also found americans are more optimistic and pessimistic that an agreement will be reached before the deadline. 58% say it is a very or somewhat likely leaders will find a solution. 39% say it is not likely. democrats are much more
of the fiscal cliff. this is about five minutes. >> good morning. this is not a progress report. there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. 8 days ago, secretary geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on. it had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts and an infinite increase in the death lemmas like forever. four days ago we offered a serious proposal. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president thought the tax rate hikes he wanted, we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending problem, not a revenue problem. the president does not agree with our proposal. i believe he has
joins mike allen at a breakfast discussion on the so- called fiscal cliff discussions. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> good morning, sunshine. welcome to the political breakfast. thank you for getting up so early. we are pleased to have an amazing double-header. if we will speak to senator rubio who last night give a big speech -- one of the first formal speeches looking ahead at the future of the republican party. we will talk about that. the amazing bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be joining us in just one second. first, welcome all of the people in a live-stream planned. we'll be taking your questions. tweet us. and to c-span. welcome to the others were watching. we appreciate bank of america for making these conversations possible. we are very, very excited to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues around washington to do things to bank of america. thank you, john. so, you may have gotten cards. the thinking about what you're going to ask. without further ado, the spring and bob woodw
" this morning -- that is a little bit from "politico" on that fiscal cliff. david, thank you for holding. caller: yes, good morning. host: what do you think about hillary clinton could go future? caller: i do not think she will run. [indiscernible] we have the man that we need [indiscernible] we are not working. there is no way the government can be supported. host: that was david from georgia them but we are able to bring you some live events to date on c-span. this afternoon, the annual christmas tree lighting. the president will be there. that will be live at 4:30 p.m. eastern time. you will be able to see the lights on the national christmas tree. that is held right in front of the white house just south of the white house. jay on our boat page says -- says -- page scott is an independent from florida. caller: good afternoon, c-span. i am going to say some things you probably do not want to hear but there are the truth about hillary clinton. i think she is very intelligent and on top of her game. when i look back at her career when her husband was president, we were having attacks on our and
the process. host: democrats line and we're looking at the fiscal cliff, go ahead. caller: good morning. i want to know why we keep talking about social security and medicare? why are we not talking about ssi and medicaid? that is where the problem really lies because they have not paid into the program. social security and medicare. if we want to fix the situation, we need to cut to that plus all these charitable contributions. we've got people spending money for christmas so why are we not able to have money in the economy? guest: on the medicare aside -- this is a very important issue were one needs a lot of public a lot -- a lot of public education about the numbers and the reality. the gap between peril taxes paid in and premiums paid into medicare and spending going out his $3 billion per year. that program is a big part of the problem. it is also true of medicaid and ssi, i think they should all be looked at carefully we have sold this section to the american public that they pay a dime into a program, they deserve all the benefits. the gap between what you pay into medicare and whe
. a joint economic committee hearing on the fiscal cliff. and shaun donovan discusses. ? morning, the national journal on the u.s. economy and a poll on the middle class. live coverage begins at 8:30 a.m. eastern on c-span 2. in the senate today, harry reid and mitch mcconnell went back and forth on fiscal cliff issues. there is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on every
of the so-called fiscal cliff. on this morning's "washington journal," we'll look at the expiring unemployment benefits. our first guest is josh boak of "the fiscal times," then we have a roundtable. "washington journal" is live every day on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3, i believe, and they're going to say that is precedent. >> and what is -- and indiana had a voter i.d. >> we talk about fact. they decided on the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. they did not say that all of those states -- >> correct. they talked about indiana. let me finish though, because you misrepresented what i said. >> no, you're misrepresenting -- >> hold on, hold on, hold on. >> this is the law of the land. >> and when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws, you know, disproportionately affect minorities -- it implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain, we're lesser. to me, if white americans can get i.d.'s to vote and go through all the processes to follo
on the fiscal cliff. here's the wall street journal -- but then here's the "washington times this morning with their deadline -- headline -- so those are two headlines on house speaker john boehner and how he is doing in the fiscal cliff tops. headline is the president and the speaker both press each other. so that the latest in the back and forth on the fiscal cliff talks. the polls out, this is one from gallup. and the new york post shows this poll -- back to our topic, our question, do you support or oppose right-to-work laws? paul in utica, michigan, democrat. caller: i live in suburban detroit. i am a retired union worker, not automotive, by the way. i don't think my union is a thug in any way, but i think it's a sad day for the state of michigan. if the workers in this country cannot look to michigan like they always have, for a decent pay, and i think that is where we are headed, i just think it is a sad day. all the people who voted for these republicans, they are going to get what they asked for. this is what is going on here. i really sad about it. host: the car czar for michiga
: democrats line and we're looking at the fiscal cliff, go ahead. caller: good morning. i want to know why we keep talking about social security and medicare? why are we not talking about ssi and medicaid? that is where the problem really lies because they have not paid into the program. it's attached to social security and medicare. if we want to fix the situation, we need to cut to that plus all these charitable contributions. we've got people spending money for christmas so why are we not able to have money in the economy? guest: on the medicare aside -- this is a very important issue were one needs a lot of public a lot -- a lot of public education about the numbers and the reality. the gap between peril taxes paid in and premiums paid into medicare and spending going out his $3 billion per year. that program is a big part of the problem. it is also true of medicaid and ssi, i think they should all be looked at carefully we have sold this section to the american public that they pay a dime into a program, they deserve all the benefits. the gap between what you pay into medicare and when y
on the fiscal cliff, a focus this morning on the expiring tax provisions. host: today we're looking at the issue of tax extenders or tax incentives for business and individuals. and joining us in this discussion is sam goldfarb, who is a tax writer for c.q. roll call. what are tax extenders? >> well, they're temporary tax breaks. that's basically i think the most basic definition and some people are kind of concerned that the entire tax code is turning into one big tax extendser. so where do you really define it? but i think traditionally they're considered to be these pretty small provisions, narrowly targeted at specific types of businesses. some of them do apply to individuals as well. >> so why are they temporary? >> that's a good question. i think a lot of people, including people in congress, say either they should be made permanent or they should be eliminated altogether. but they're temporary because it's easier to pass that way. it looks like it costs less. usually they keep on being ex tended and extended. so so in effect they're almost permanent. host: we're going to look at some of t
, a little bit more about the fiscal cliff. >> we turn our attention this morning about unemployment benefits and how insurance could back -- how insurance could be impacted. thank you for coming in. we want to start the discussion. when we're talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are we talking about here? >> unemployment insurance is the combination of federal and state programs. it usually lasts up to six weeks. it can be extended up to 93 weeks, depending on which they were in. it is this extension that we're really talking about as part of the fiscal cliff. >> that is what might be cut. that is what automatically expires. we know it cost $30 billion to continue additional unemployment benefits. of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. firm stand. we have seen in the past obama host: what specific benefits do guest: usually some kind of a cash benefit or they may help the search for a job. it is usually about $300 a week. it can vary from state sen. in the mississippi i want to say it is closer to $200. host: how are the programs funded? payroll tax
: let me give you some other headlines as we continue this discussion this morning about the fiscal cliff. this is from "the washington post." "egyptian opposition confused over next step." host: also from "of the washington times" this morning -- "hillary clinton will testify on the hill." "and no date has been announced for her testimony, either in open or closed session. the state department has put forth and accountability review board and that is investigating the attacks. host: burke, new orleans. what are you willing to sacrifice? caller code good morning. i think that we are spending way too much on this drug war. it is costing the nation way too much at the end of the day and we need to reevaluate ourselves on it. i am for reducing revenue. we should adopt a poll tax in this nation or a transaction tax on security. i do not know. the lancelot. host: all right. -- thanks a lot. host: all right. this headline, "the u.s. knew for years about the benghazi extremism." front page of "the new york times" has this story, "mortgage crisis brings a new reckoning to banks. in the wors
to 7.7%. that being shaded on what is going on with decisions by the fiscal cliff. another economic news this morning, a story in the wall street journal looking at general motors. it says -- earlier this year, 675,000 vehicles a in inventory. houston, texas, this is eric. caller: i am if first-time caller. years or 22 years old. i have spent of this entire year try to educate myself a lot more on the whole -- let me get right to the point. i think it should be a state decision. the supreme court should allow the states to make the kind of a decision. giving more people -- in giving more power to the government to regulate this on a national level will create so many issues down the road, and it probably a lot of issues in the immediate -- the reason we even got to this. is because we get some much power to the government to regulate all of the different things and issues. giving them more power is just going to create more problems. my basic thought is, more government power, more issues. host: we will leave it there. victor on the republican line. caller: i do not think the suprem
. and on tomorrow morning's "washington journal" peter welch and the latest developments on the fiscal cliff negotiations. josephhat, political'o's schatz. "washington journal" live tomorrow morning at 7 a.m. eastern. >> we have had explosions of knowledge in medicine. we have not coordinated. there are services that we have. they end up having so many cracks that the cracks are harmful to the diseases we are treating. you need to step back and ask, are we hurting people over all on a global level? what are we doing question mark -- what are we doing? now we have reports saying that 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare. the test we order and the procedures -- this is something that i think for the first time is really being called out as a problem. >> this function in the u.s. industry. dr. marty makary on c-span 2. >> the group campaign to fix the debt -- the former co-chair of the national debt commission. at the event, we hear from white house economic adviser gene sperling and senator rob portman of ohio. senator portman was interrupted several times by protesters.
a 39.6%. that's the washington post this morning. below that, governors say the fiscal cliff would hurt their states' economies. several governors met at the white house yesterday and with political leaders to say something needs to be done or their economies and on the state level will be heard. -- be hurt. let's go to walter in new jersey, independent caller. good morning. caller: good morning. i don't know what's wrong with these people, because they have to come to some kind of agreement. the gop has to give ground, taxes wouldybody's go up just to save 2%. it just does not cut it. it is a bad move politically and bad for the country. host: polloi in johnsonville, virginia. -- floyd. caller: i was thinking about the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's the problem at. the problem is when we fell off the moral cliff. our president said gay marriage was ok. and america killing so many babies. side,e get back on god's everything else will take care of itself. that's the way it is. a guy said it seemed like christians are down and out. let me tell you, christians are the happiest people t
with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as part of the discussions going on in washington. the president was very open. we talked about some of the issues we focus on as governors, one of those same opportunities for flexibility, in terms of some of the programs we partner with the federal government. he was open to that as well. and there is an impact not just from the fiscal issues, but the issues in terms of how the discussions here will impact the economy's back
on the so-called fiscal cliff. he spoke to reporters for about five minutes. >> good morning. this is not a proper support because there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff, the white house has wasted another week. eight days ago, secretary brightener came here to offer a geithner pena to offer a plan. four days ago, we offered a proposal based on testimony of president clinton gaming former chief of staff. there has been a counter offer from the white house. reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, the president wants to raise tax rates. if the president get the tax hikes he wanted, we would continue to see trillion-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spinning not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, he is obligated to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready to talk to the president about a plan. >> you spoke with the pres
and the middle east. that's on the c-span networks. tomorrow morning, a program looking at the fiscal cliff and what could happen if the budget cuts set to go in effect take place in january. we will hear from jim doyle on how the fiscal cliff could affect businesses and charles park from the government executive media group. he will look at domestic program cuts. then more and your e-mail, phone calls and tweets. that's on "washington journal" tomorrow morning starting at 7:00. on capitol hill, a house is back in tomorrow. members will consider whether to send negotiators to meet with the senate on defense department programs for next year. off the floor of negotiations continuing over the fiscal clef. that's a combination of tax increases and spending cuts set to begin in january. live coverage of the house tomorrow at 2:00 eastern on c- span. earlier today, the pew center on the states held a discussion about the 2012 election and this upcoming panel focused on voter registration and on-line registration compared to using paper and mail. this is about one hour. the next discussion is a t
in the fiscal cliff. after that, a panel on innovation and the economy. later a conversation about have the fiscal deadline could affect the defense budget. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the so- called fiscal clef and what happens if the budget cuts take place in january. jim doyle the effect on businesses. after that, charles clark looks at domestic program cuts. in more about the issue with the brookings institution. bless your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets. that is live tuesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, president obama talking about the economy and the need to reach an agreement with congress on the january fiscal deadline. he spoke at a diesel plant outside of detroit. his remarks are about 25 minutes. >> hello, redford! [applause] it is good to be back in michigan. [applause] how is everybody doing today? [applause] now, let me just start off by saying we have something in common -- both our teams lost yesterday. [laughter] i mean, i would like to come here and talk a little smack about the bears, but we didn't quite get it
as the fiscal cliff take effect. bloomberg government hosted a discussion this morning with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen as well as republican senator bob corker and senator mark warner. at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house spear jaub boehner and spoke about the fiscal cliff today. republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. house speaker calling on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit proposal. president obama is at 9:00 eastern followed by speaker boehner. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to japan. >> everybody has their own view what happened and i don't want to argue survival to anyone in japan about the history. we're past that. and my whole purpose for being here is to listen to the living and to do what i can. >> sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 i believe and going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the in
. caller: i feel like i hit the trifecta because all three segments this morning has to do with the fiscal cliff. my question has to do with each segment and as the host, if i could ask, the first segment if you could pose this question to the other two guests that you had the other two segments, my question is a lot of people have whether they're on tv or locally or in newspaper have forgotten about the 21 new taxes that are coming up january 1 relating to obamacare. i'm sorry, the health care system. and this affects all americans, not just the high owners or the poor. and my question is how does this affect the 12 taxes are going to be on the middle -- on all americans and i think nine of them are going to be initiating for businesses. how does that affect, you know, any of these negotiations and how come nobody is bringing up 21 new taxes? i mean, to me, you know, the republicans and democrats, the democrats like to see taxes going up and the republicans don't want them to go up. host: ok. guest: i think both sides are committed to trying to stop the increase in personal taxes for smal
republican bob corker and other members of congress talking about this fiscal cliff. hosted by bloomberg government and the lloyd. this is about an hour. -- and deloitte. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al
this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning. lings -- the president said on a daily basis that we should be passing a balance plan. but we continue to hear only discussion on one side of the ledger. it's always been about tax rates increases and nothing about spending. we insist, let's talk about a balanced plan, where are your proposals for spending cuts. even his advisors say any agreement we come to has to include entitlement programs. we ask the president, please, sit down and be specific with us. let's get that balanced plan. it's interesting the senate passed a bill. the president continues to say support that bill, pass that bill. how is that the case when he continues to say we also need $1.4 trillion in additional new revenues. there's an inconsistency here. let's stop playing gapes. we want to be here for the american people and we want to make sure that we get a balanced solution so that we can start focusing on the one thing that we have seemed to have forgotten, and that is, it's about jobs and the
. [applause] >> on this morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the fiscal cliff and what happens a gold buckle -- if the budget cuts take place. jim doyle on the effect on businesses. then at charles clarke will look at domestic program cuts. more about the issue, with the brookings institution and the ethics and policy center. "washington journal" live this morning at 7:00 eastern on c- span. now a discussion on a state of voter id laws and 2012 pope. we will hear from ohio secretary of state sessions thiswo session and we have to end at 5:00 so want to get started. we brought together a series of experts and leaders in the field to talk about the issue of integrity verses access in elections where a voter i.d. fits into this. don't think we could do better than the panel we have right now. i will let our moderator introduce our panel, many of whom you'll recognize. >> you guys are in for a trade. you could ask for a better panel to think through these issues of how to balance integrity and access. i will say a word about each of the panelists. we will hear brief present
will talk about the economic needs of middle class families and ways to avoid -- to avoid the fiscal cliff here on c-span. until then, more about the budget cuts and how they could affect the nation's defense budget and national security from this morning's "washington journal." host: we are continuing our series, looking at different parts of the fiscal cliff talks. today we want to focus on sequestration. joining us now is robert levenson, a senior defense analyst at bloomberg government. let's begin with what secret -- with what sequestration means. term. if you have looked it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a crisis over raising the debt ceiling. republicans demanded some cuts from congress. they agreed to $1 trillion in cuts, they handed over $1.50 trillion to the super committee. because they failed to come up with a deal that could be approved by congress and the pre
of negotiations on the so-called fiscal cliff. disagreements on taxing the wealthy remains one of the sticking points between the two sides. this is about five minutes. >> good morning, everyone. this is not a progress report because there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. eight days ago, secretary geithner kaine your to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on. it had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts, and it had an indefinite and infinite increase in the debt limit, like forever. four days ago, we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to push our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike he wan
is the political appetite if we go over the fiscal cliff? you can't save your way into prosperity. would there be any appetite for infrastructure -- we made no distongues between debt per se, consumeables like military consumeables or unemployment and capital projects. is there any appetite to reality for capital projects to get us out of this mess? guest: there is on our side. are you absolutely ry. this is a good time -- there's borrowing and borrowing. you are borrowing to build a bridge and it's going to be used for two, three, four generations. that's a legitimate reason to borrow. we have w.p.a. buildings in vermont built in the roosevelt years. we are still using them. that's legitimate. also we have such a crumbling infrastructure in this country. roads and bridges, our airports need improvement. we need to have broadband deployed throughout the country. there are things that need to be done. in doing of them, borrowing money for those capital projects, that makes sense. you are not borrowing money for your living expenses, in effect. it's like borrowing money so you can buy a ho
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
of a fiscal cliff. we did not arrive there by not paying enough taxes. the federal government spends insane amounts of money and even by reducing us all to serfs, the taxes will not cover the spending. well said. here's jerry from lamar. she said, please stop spending our money. walk away from the table if they're not willing to stop wasting our hard-earned money. reform the entitlements and lower the taxes. nothing else in my opinion is acceptable. do not go back to the clinton era. that administration led use in a recession and do not raise the inheritance tax. and then listen to this, she said, i am from a family of farmers. that will kill our family and many others and make it impossible to keep farms that have been in our family for generations. that is the most unfair tax there is. this country will not survive more blows to small business and the middle class. stop the insanity and stop it soon. and finally from patrigsa in jefferson city, she said, i want to voice my opinion on what's happening in washington right now. politicians have put us in this mess with excessive spending. i
as the fiscal cliff take effect. bloomberg government and consulting hosted a discussion this morning with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen, along with bob corker and mark warner. and then at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house speaker john boehner. they also spoke about the fiscal cliff today. the president said republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. then the house speaker called on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit reduction proposal that was released earlier this week. president obama is at 9:00 eastern and then speaker boehner. at the museum today, florida senator marco rubio sat down with michaelen of "politico." he answered questions about the fiscal cliff. republican outreach to hispanic voters and a potential campaign for president. this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you very much. you had a late night. >> not really. >> is bob still here? what would you like to ask senator rubio? [laughter] >> are you still doing this? >> ask him a real question. this is a grea
. 2012] >> the joint economic committee held its hearings on the fiscal cliff, house minority leader nancy pelosi spoke to reporters about the issue. she called the republican proposal "an assault on middle- class and seniors." >> good morning. here we are. thursday in december, the talk around here is what is going not at the negotiating table. is anything going on at the negotiating table? what is important, i think, is what is happening at kitchen tables across america. the relationship to decisions that are made here to what those discussions are. i think it is important to take a moment to see the context with which these negotiations are taking place. the middle class -- and we saw the republican plan, the proposal was an assault on a middle-class, seniors and on our future. when you look at kitchen tables across the country and how people are concerned about how they pay their bills, it is important to know that all of those decisions the mermaid to the economic security -- the decisions that are made have an impact on middle class families and on the prospects of the future f
are on the question of resolving the immediate fiscal cliff issues. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation and a deal on the tax or spending sequester side or both? >> good morning. i am not gene sperling. i am pleased to be with you and give you my perspective on where we are. i will start by something i often say when i am giving remarks in my district -- that i am struck with in my district in philadelphia. people of this same group no matter how partisan or how non- partisan the group is, people will say different things to me. they will say, i want you to go to washington and stand on your principles. do not give an inch. go and fight for us. i say, i will. someone else will say, i want you to compromise, find that middle ground, and get things done. that is the 10th time that has happened. that is what they hired me to do is to figure out how we do both. it is our job as representatives in congress to fight for our values and priorities and principles we believe in and get something done. the divide that we are facing right now is -- i ho
:30 eastern. you can see the house live when they return here on c-span. in the meantime while fiscal cliff negotiations continue, we hosted a roundtable discussion about the debt talks and domestic program cuts on this morning's "washington journal." can host: isabel sawhim and james capretta. mr. capretta, let me begin with you. are these sequester cuts devastating? guest: they would be deep cuts. 80% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in the immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world? no. host: what do you mean by that? guest: there would be a downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of domestic accounts. so there would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduce in federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of 5%, 10%. so there would be some downsizing of the services that are provided by the federal government. but the economy would go on and the government would go on and the public would still continue to get by and large serviced. host: can agen
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35